Alice's Adventures in Wonderland: AND Alice Through the Looking Glass

Author(s): Lewis Carroll; A. S. Byatt (Introduction by); John Tenniel (Illustrator)

Classics

Nominated as one of America's best-loved novels by PBS's The Great American Read

Original, experimental, and unparalleled in their charm, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There have enchanted readers for generations. The topsy-turvy dream worlds of Wonderland and the Looking-Glass realm are full of the unexpected: A baby turns into a pig, time stands still at a "mad" tea-party, and a chaotic game of chess turns seven-year-old Alice into a queen. These unforgettable tales--filled with sparkling wordplay and unbridled imagination--balance joyous nonsense with poignant moments of longing for the lost innocence of childhood.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


Product Information

Short-listed for BBC Big Read Top 100 2003.

"Lewis Carroll," creator of the brilliantly witty Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, was a pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a shy Oxford don with a stammer. He was born at Daresbury, Cheshire on January 27, 1832, son of a vicar. As the eldest boy among eleven children, he learned early to amuse his siblings by writing and editing family magazines. He was educated at Christ Church College, Oxford, where he lectured in mathematics from1855 to 1881. In 1861 he was ordained as a deacon. Dodgson's entry into the world of fiction was accidental. It happened one "golden afternoon" as he escorted his colleague's three daughters on a trip up the river Isis. There he invented the story that might have been forgotten if not for the persistence of the youngest girl, Alice Liddell. Thanks to her, and to her encouraging friends, Alice was published in 1865, with drawings by the political cartoonist, John Tenniel. After Alice, Dodgson wrote Phantasmagoria and Other Poems (1869), Through the Looking-Glass (1871), The Hunting of Shark (1876, and Rhyme? and Reason? (1883). As a mathematician Dodgson is best known for Euclid and His Modern Rivals (1879). He was also a superb children's photographer, who captured the delicate, sensuous beauty of such little girls as Alice Liddell and Ellen Terry, the future actress. W.H. Auden called him "one of the best portrait photographer of the century." Dodgson was also an inventor; his projects included a game of arithmetic croquet, a substitute for glue, and an apparatus for making notes in the dark. Though he sought publication for his light verse, he never dreamed his true gift-telling stories to children-merited publication or lasting fame, and he avoided publicity scrupulously Charles Dodgson died in 1898 of influenza.

General Fields

  • : 9780375761386
  • : Random House, Incorporated
  • : Random House, Incorporated
  • : May 2003
  • : 203mm X 134mm X 18mm
  • : United States
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : [Fic]
  • : English
  • : English
  • : Lewis Carroll; A. S. Byatt (Introduction by); John Tenniel (Illustrator)
  • : Lewis Carroll; A. S. Byatt (Introduction by); John Tenniel (Illustrator)
  • : New edition
  • : illustrations
  • : New edition
  • : illustrations
  • : Paperback
  • : Paperback
  • : 304
  • : 304
  • : [Fic]